HOW TEACHERS CAN PROMOTE PARENT PARTICIPATION





Research demonstrates that kids are most likely to succeed when their parents are directly and actively involved in their education.





EDUCATORS MAY SOMETIMES FEEL PRESSURED BY HIGHLY INVOLVED PARENTS. IN THESE SITUATIONS, A STEP BACK IS NEEDED TO REALIZE THE BIG PICTURE AND HOW IMPORTANT ACTIVE PARENTS ARE TO A STUDENTS SUCCESS.



The reality is that the above scenario is rare and we want to encourage more parent participation in our students education.


I read this quote and it comes from Fathers' Involvement in Their Children's Schools, a report from the National Center for Education Statistics.

"School-aged children in both two-parent and low-income households are more likely to get mostly A's, to enjoy school, and to take part in extracurricular activities and are less likely to have ever repeated a grade and to have ever been suspended or expelled if their fathers or mothers have high instead of low levels of participation in their schools."


Additional studies have found that parental involvement is more important to student achievement, at every grade level than family income or education. That's stunning; we often believe that economic situations dictate a students direction, but in reality, it's as simple as parent involvement.


However, Strong Families, Strong Schools, a report that reflects 30 decades of research on family participation in education, stated the sad fact that "in most cases, parents don't feel as if we welcome them in school."


Additionally, we've often found that using great tools can help with this.



Building That Bridge

"Educators have to be willing to comprehend the extent of the disconnection as a precondition for involving families in their children's schooling," the report continued, offering the following suggestions for reducing this sense of detachment:

  1. Make certain the very first contact with parents is a favorable one.
  2. Communicate with parents straightforwardly and prevent using educational "jargon."
  3. Make sure that all parents have regular access to succinct, clear, and readily comprehensible information regarding their children's school and classroom.
  4. Ask parents to discuss their opinions and concerns regarding college, and then deal with those concerns.
  5. Accommodate cultural and language differences.


Here are some resources I like to share with educators and parents:


The Parent Coach Plan:
This website offers parenting tools that encourage Involvement and engagement between students and their parents:
https://www.parentcoachplan.com/printable-parenting-tools.php


Homework Help:
This resource provides parents with tools and assistance in motivating your child to do their homework:
https://www.pta.org/programs/content.cfm?ItemNumber=1411


10 Tips for Successful Parent-Teacher Conferences:
https://www.familyeducation.com/school/parent-teacher-conferences/10-tips-successful-parent-teacher-conference


Promoting Reading At Home:
Great tips on how parents can encourage reading, making it fun and exciting:
http://www.newsforparents.org/expert_promote_reading_at_home.html


It is my hope that some of the ideas shared here will help you encourage and foster more parent participation within your daily practice.